Posted by: Johan Normark | April 11, 2010

2012: Hominin skeletons as ”mysterious elders”

Fortunately I have had little to do with the 2012 circus during the past two months. Apart from accepting to create a blog post on the astrologer Terry Nazon in cooperation with the blog “Exposing Pseudoastronomy”, the only 2012 related activity I have done is to actually see the movie in Thailand. I will review it shortly in the future (it will be short since there is not much Maya stuff in it). Quick looks through various 2012 forums indicate that people have still been active on Bast’s forum whereas the Swedish forum has decreasing activity.

People may recall that one of my latest 2012 related posts discusses Bast’s idea of mysterious elders. Basically, these elders were or are people with great knowledge that wander around the Earth and initiate civilizations. Two weeks ago Bast made his own interpretation of the recent find of a bone in the Altai mountains in Siberia called “Woman X”. Let us first see what Reuters report. The mitochondria DNA taken from a bone indicates that the hominin’s line diverged from the line that created Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis (or Homo sapiens neanderthalensis) about one million years ago. This makes it younger than Homo erectus which spread out of Africa much earlier. The most interesting part of the story is that Woman X may have lived as late as 40-30,000 years ago. Yet another late non-sapien hominin is of course the “hobbit” on Flores (Homo floresiensis).

How do Bast interpret “Woman X”? You got it. It is most likely a mysterious elder. Here is a quote: “Just as Neanderthals could theoretically live amongst us without us realizing they are a different species, so could this new strain. Speculating further, this could be representative of the civilization that gave us the Long Count calendar. An additional speculation could find them living amongst us today…

If there are any “mysterious elders” amongst us today, perhaps they are suddenly disappearing, rather than risk a DNA match….

First of all, Neanderthals may not have been another species, they are sometimes called a subspecies of Homo sapiens. The whole definition of species is based on Aristotelian essences. All animals and plants show variation and only in a limited slice of the time-space continuum can we define a species from another species. Seen in a temporal continuity we cannot say when one species turned into another (it does not occur from one generation to the next). Fossils are few compared to the amount of individuals that once existed and by relying on these few remains one get the wrong idea that animals are clearly defined units in time. I am pretty sure we would know if there was another species of hominins living among us today. The whole “conspiracy” idea that they would hide out because they will risk a DNA match is solely based on “modern” ideas of what constitutes a species in biology. I am pretty sure that a “mysterious elder” in the Late Formative Maya area would have little problem with such ideas…

Best of all is Bast’s speculation that this new strain gave us the Long Count calendar. This is yet another example of speculation with no substance to it. Do we have “Women Xs” in Mesoamerica as well? If so, are these the Epi-Olmecs? Is this the civilization he talks about or is it yet another mysterious civilization that gave rise to pyramids in other parts of the world as well? Here Bast relies on the same essentialist thinking as he uses when he discusses species. There are no clearly defined civilizations separate from others. Everything is fluid, not solid forms. How does he explain the temporal and spatial gap between the Altai mountains roughly 30,000 BC to Mesoamerica 3114 BC (or rather a few decades before the birth of Christ when we have the earliest Long Count inscription)? Of course he cannot do that without relying on some essentialist ideas such as his mysterious elders. It is complete nonsense.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. man what is your fb site?

  2. That information is confidential.


Categories

%d bloggers like this: